A social group promoting the history and amenities of Stow-on-the-Wold, Gloucestershire

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Friday, 1st Feb 2019

 

'Winchcombshire'

The forgotten county

 

By Tim Porter

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Stones in his pockets

 

Wednesday 24th April 2019

Malvern Theatre

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Stones-in-his-Pockets Kings Arms 1

The Kings Arms

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The King’s Arms is a classic example of a coaching inn, although the archway has been moved. It was originally where the door to the main bar is today, as can be seen in some of the photographs here. Coaches would pull up under the archway to let customers directly into the inn. The coach would then continue into the yard at the rear to be turned around and the team of horses changed. Stabling would have been provided in the yard, with ancillary trades such as a farrier along Well Lane.

 

The inn was licensed by Edward VI in 1548 and said to be ‘the best Inn between London and Worcester’. In 1635, following the legalisation of the postal services, it became a ‘Post House’ welcoming the new ‘Post Chaise’ 4-horse stage coaches with a Postillion riding one of the horses. Post horns were used to warn of their arrival, ensuring a quick turnaround.

 

Charles I is said to have stayed here on his way to the Battle of Naseby in 1645.

 

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Spooky Spectre in Stow

It is said that, late at night, sad wailing cries can sometimes be heard in The King’s Arms. The cries are from the ghosts of soldiers who met their end in the bloody Civil War battle that took place only a few paces away.

Another regular ghostly visitor is a woman in Victorian dress. She is said to wear a high-necked, white lace blouse, featuring leg-of-mutton sleeves and caught at the throat with a cameo brooch. Her skirt is made of black silk and her grey hair is tied in a cottage bun. She carries a dainty, lace-embroidered handkerchief, is prosperous looking and wears expensive jet jewellery.

This Victorian spectre has a habit of opening doors and turning lights on and off. She takes no notice of anyone around her, although does seem to like watching television with other guests. It is only when the lady disappears that terrified guests realise that they have been enjoying their favourite programme with a spectre from another dimension.

Spooky Spectre in Stow

 

It is said that, late at night, sad wailing cries can sometimes be heard in The King’s Arms. The cries are from the ghosts of soldiers who met their end in the bloody Civil War battle that took place only a few paces away.

 

Another regular ghostly visitor is a woman in Victorian dress. She is said to wear a high-necked, white lace blouse, featuring leg-of-mutton sleeves and caught at the throat with a cameo brooch. Her skirt is made of black silk and her grey hair is tied in a cottage bun. She carries a dainty, lace-embroidered handkerchief, is prosperous looking and wears expensive jet jewellery.

 

This Victorian spectre has a habit of opening doors and turning lights on and off. She takes no notice of anyone around her, although does seem to like watching television with other guests. It is only when the lady disappears that terrified guests realise that they have been enjoying their favourite programme with a spectre from another dimension.